Mon, 03 Jan | Oruru Valley Rodeo Club

Oruru Valley Rodeo, 3rd Jan 2022

The Oruru Valley Rodeo is our main event of the year. Every year on the 3rd of January you can come to see some of the best cowboys and cowgirls in NZ saddle up to compete in the 7 events rodeo has to offer
Oruru Valley Rodeo, 3rd Jan 2022

Time & Location

03 Jan 2022, 10:00 am
Oruru Valley Rodeo Club, 1120 Oruru Road, Peria 0482, New Zealand

About The Event

The Oruru Valley Rodeo is our main event of the year. Every year on the 3rd of January you can come to see some of the best cowboys and cowgirls in NZ saddle up to compete in the 7 events rodeo has to offer. 

For those of you wanting to get into rodeo, Oruru Valley Rodeo is hosting a local barrel racing event on the day! This is a chance for you to experience the excitement of rodeo racing against other new competitors. Enter on the day for this awesome event. We look forward to seeing you there. 

VENDORS: On the day you can treat yourselves to some yummy kai, and activities for the family curtesy of our amazing vendors.

THE EVENTS:

BAREBACK

The rider attempts to stay on the back of his horse using only his balance and a suitcase type handhold, known as a rigging, which is placed on top of the horse's withers then secured with a cinch. The rigging must be of NZRCA approved standards.

STEER WRESTLING

Steer Wrestling, or "bulldogging" as it is sometimes known, has the basic objective for the steer wrestler to use his technique and strength to wrestle the steer to the ground, in the fastest time possible. Like with rope & tie and team ropers, the steer wrestler starts the event on the back of his horse in the timed event box.

BARREL RACING

Barrel Racing (Open & Second Division) is a female only event. The objective of a Barrel Racing run is to ride a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels as quickly as possible. The time starts when the barrel racer crosses electronic timers on her horse.

TEAM ROPING

Team Roping is the only team event in rodeo. There are two ropers, one known as the header and the other is the heeler. Just like rope & tie ropers and steer wrestlers the ropers start the event on the back of their horses in the timed event box.

ROPE AND TIE

The roots of the rope and tie event can be traced back to the working ranches of the Old West. When calves were sick or injured, cowboys had to rope and immobilize them quickly and safely for veterinary treatment. Ranch hands prided themselves on the speed and skill with which they could rope and tie calves such that it soon became a popular competitive sport.

Oruru valley rodeo also offers a version of this event for female and junior competitors called breakaway roping. This is where the competitor ropes the calf and stops causing the rope to ‘break’ off of the saddle horn indicating the end of the run.

SADDLE BRONC

The event that started rodeo, it originated from the necessary job of breaking in and training horses to be used in ranches, in the days of the Wild West.

BULL RIDING (also Novice Steer Ride & Junior Steer Ride)

Open Bull Riding is usually the last event to be held at a rodeo, and is the most dangerous. Just like Bareback and Saddle Bronc riding the rider can only hold onto the animal with one hand, touching it with his free arm will get him disqualified. Bull riders are not required to mark out a bull, spurring a bull will add to his score but it is not a requirement of the ride, staying on the bull for 8 seconds (Open & Second Division) or 6 seconds (Novice Steer & Junior Steer Ride) is required for a qualified ride.

Get Tickets
Price
Quantity
Total
  • Child
    $5
    $5
    0
    $0
  • Adult
    $10
    $10
    0
    $0
  • Family
    $25
    $25
    0
    $0
Total$0

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